Monday, 21 October 2013

Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Apple & Blackberry Jelly

Unlike classic panna cottas, which tend to use cream or milk, this recipe uses buttermilk. I love the slightly sour, acidic tang that it gives to the finished dish. This is a great dessert to serve after a rich meal and is easily paired with a variety of seasonal fruits at different times of the year. The recipe that I have given here includes a thin layer of blackberry and apple jelly, which is then topped with a few whole blackberries. You can experiment with different flavoured jellies… they are genuinely very easy to make and do finish off the dessert beautifully. I particularly like the lemon and stem ginger jelly that I sometimes make to top the panna cotta with!

Traditionally, buttermilk is the liquid that is left over after churning butter from cream. Nowadays, modern dairy technologies mean that cream can be easily skimmed from whole milk but historically, the milk was left to sit for a period of time to allow the cream and milk to separate – the cream was then used for making butter and the liquid left behind was the buttermilk.

Buttermilk is a key ingredient in traditional Irish soda bread where baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is used as the leavening agent instead of yeast. The lactic acid in the buttermilk reacts with the baking soda to form tiny bubbles of carbon dioxide which make the bread rise when baked.

Buttermilk is readily available in shops and supermarkets in Ireland. But the variety that I prefer to use is made using traditional methods by Cuinneog. The company was set up by Tom and Sheila Butler in Balla, County Mayo in 1990 and in addition to buttermilk also produces butter.

Cuinneog has received many awards for its products over the past few years including Gold Great Taste Awards in 2006, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. It was also recognised for excellence in quality and traditional production method was awarded a Eirgrid Euro-toques food award in 2010.  

 

Ingredients:

Panna cotta:
3 sheets of leaf gelatine
400ml natural yogurt
150ml buttermilk
150ml crème fraîche
125g caster sugar
Apple & Blackberry Jelly:
2 sheets of leaf gelatine
150ml apple juice
150g blackberries
1 tablespoon of caster sugar


Method:







Panna cotta:
1.                  Soak the gelatine in a small bowl of water for 3-5 minutes until softened. Remove from water, squeeze out the excess water and set aside.
2.                  Put 100ml of the yoghurt in a small pan with the sugar and heat just enough to melt the sugar.
3.                  Warm the gelatine in a small pan with 1 tablespoon of water, until dissolved (do not let boil).
4.                  Pour the warm yoghurt onto the gelatine and mix well and then add in the rest of the yoghurt.
5.                  Pass this mixture through a fine sieve in to a medium bowl set over a large bowl full of ice. Whisk the mix gently as it cools, but do not let cool completely.
6.                 
Lightly whip the
Unlike classic panna cottas, which tend to use cream or milk, this recipe uses buttermilk. I love the slightly sour, acidic tang that it gives to the finished dish. This is a great dessert to serve after a rich meal and is easily paired with a variety of seasonal fruits at different times of the year. The recipe that I have given here includes a thin layer of blackberry and apple jelly, which is then topped with a few whole blackberries. You can experiment with different flavoured jellies… they are genuinely very easy to make and do finish off the dessert beautifully. I particularly like the lemon and stem ginger jelly that I sometimes make to top the panna cotta with!

Traditionally, buttermilk is the liquid that is left over after churning butter from cream. Nowadays, modern dairy technologies mean that cream can be easily skimmed from whole milk but historically, the milk was left to sit for a period of time to allow the cream and milk to separate – the cream was then used for making butter and the liquid left behind was the buttermilk.

Buttermilk is a key ingredient in traditional Irish soda bread where baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is used as the leavening agent instead of yeast. The lactic acid in the buttermilk reacts with the baking soda to form tiny bubbles of carbon dioxide which make the bread rise when baked.

Buttermilk is readily available in shops and supermarkets in Ireland. But the variety that I prefer to use is made using traditional methods by Cuinneog. The company was set up by Tom and Sheila Butler in Balla, County Mayo in 1990 and in addition to buttermilk also produces butter.

Cuinneog has received many awards for its products over the past few years including Gold Great Taste Awards in 2006, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. It was also recognised for excellence in quality and traditional production method was awarded a Eirgrid Euro-toques food award in 2010.  

 

Ingredients:

Panna cotta:
3 sheets of leaf gelatine
400ml natural yogurt
150ml buttermilk
150ml crème fraîche
125g caster sugar
Apple & Blackberry Jelly:
2 sheets of leaf gelatine
150ml apple juice
150g blackberries
1 tablespoon of caster sugar


Method:

Panna cotta:
1.                  Soak the gelatine in a small bowl of water for 3-5 minutes until softened. Remove from water, squeeze out the excess water and set aside.
2.                  Put 100ml of the yoghurt in a small pan with the sugar and heat just enough to melt the sugar.
3.                  Warm the gelatine in a small pan with 1 tablespoon of water, until dissolved (do not let boil).
4.                  Pour the warm yoghurt onto the gelatine and mix well and then add in the rest of the yoghurt.
5.                  Pass this mixture through a fine sieve in to a medium bowl set over a large bowl full of ice. Whisk the mix gently as it cools, but do not let cool completely.
6.                  Lightly whip the crème fraîche and fold into the buttermilk and yoghurt mixture.
7.                  Pour into individual glass serving bowls and place in fridge to set.
Apple & Blackberry Jelly:
1.                  Soak the gelatine in a small bowl of water for 3-5 minutes until softened. Remove from water, squeeze out the excess water and set aside.
2.                  Put the rest of the ingredients for the jelly into a small saucepan and heat gently until the sugar dissolves and the blackberries are softened, about 10 minutes. Crush the blackberries and pass the mixture through a fine sieve into a bowl. Allow cool slightly and then mix in the gelatine, whisking to distribute and ensure that it is properly mixed. Pass through a sieve again and allow cool. Before it sets, pour a thin layer onto each of the pannacottas and return to fridge to finish setting.
3.                  Serve with a few blackberries, placed on the top of each individual panna cotta.

Serves 4

 and fold into the buttermilk and crème fraîche.

7.                  Pour into individual glass serving bowls and place in fridge to set.
Apple & Blackberry Jelly:
1.                  Soak the gelatine in a small bowl of water for 3-5 minutes until softened. Remove from water, squeeze out the excess water and set aside.
2.                  Put the rest of the ingredients for the jelly into a small saucepan and heat gently until the sugar dissolves and the blackberries are softened, about 10 minutes. Crush the blackberries and pass the mixture through a fine sieve into a bowl. Allow cool slightly and then mix in the gelatine, whisking to distribute and ensure that it is properly mixed. Pass through a sieve again and allow cool. Before it sets, pour a thin layer onto each of the pannacottas and return to fridge to finish setting.
3.                  Serve with a few blackberries, placed on the top of each individual panna cotta.

Serves 4